The Job Exchange

Tapping Into The Hidden Job Market

We’ve Moved!

Come join us at our new site, The Underground Job Network!

See you there!!

05/07/2009 Posted by | General | Leave a comment

Weekly Roundup

In case you missed them, here are the posts (in descending order) our readers viewed the most last week:

Top Social Media Sites for Job Searching

Apply Now: The Black Hole

Job Search Secret: Trade Shows

Sallie Mae To Add 2,000 US Jobs

How To Find a Job

05/03/2009 Posted by | General | | Leave a comment

Weekly Roundup

In case you missed them, here are the top posts (in descending order) our readers viewed last week:

 

3,706 Social Networking Jobs

 

Job Search Secret: Trade Shows

 

Sallie Mae To Add 2,000 US Jobs

 

Fannie Mae & Freddie Mac: 3,000+ Jobs

04/18/2009 Posted by | General | , | Leave a comment

Weekly Roundup

In case you missed them, here are the top posts (in descending order) our readers viewed last week:

 

Sallie Mae To Add 2,000 US Jobs 

 

Disrupt the Status Quo — Avoid The Resume Black Hole

 

Call Centers Hiring

 

An Open Letter to Human Resources Leadership

 

Yahoo! HotJobs Top 100 Companies Hiring Now

04/12/2009 Posted by | General | , | Leave a comment

Weekly Roundup

The following posts were read the most last week by our readers. Check them out in case you missed any.

Disrupt the Status Quo — Avoid The Resume Black Hole

An Open Letter to Human Resources Leadership

Yahoo! HotJobs Top 100 Companies Hiring Now

Recruiters: How Big Is Your Black Hole?

Help-Wanted: Fraud Investigators

04/05/2009 Posted by | General | | Leave a comment

Last Week’s Top Posts

In case you missed them, here are the top posts (in descending order) our readers looked at last week:

 

> The Best Companies to Work For are Hiring 

 

> Apply Now: The Black Hole 

 

> Job Search Engine: LinkUp         

 

> Top 10 Social Sites for Finding a Job 

03/15/2009 Posted by | General | , | 2 Comments

Jobs Resources in the U.S. by State

From JobHunt.org:

There are dozens of job and career resources on these pages. Click on a state’s link and you will see an amazing list of sites — some known, some not — including a link I found for 101 Job Boards at http://www.andreas.com/faq-jobsites.html. Go and explore!

Select your state from the listing here to go to the page that lists Web sites that offer employment or networking opportunities in a state. Paste this into your browser if the link doesn’t work http://www.job-hunt.org/jobs/states.shtml.

03/03/2009 Posted by | General, job search | , , | 3 Comments

The Army of Unemployed

Adlai Wertman is a Professor and Founder of the Society and Business Lab at the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California

He writes:

According to the Association of Fundraising Professionals, 53% of charities received decreased donations in the fourth quarter of 2008 (the time of year when many charities receive as much as 60% of their annual income).

Is this a time, though, where we can apply a basic math rule — two negatives equal a positive? Could a large group of unemployed actually be good for the charities? Without sounding callous, we now have millions of people with more time on their hands. And this is not just any time — it is the time of able bodied, often highly-skilled workers. It is also the free time of those with college and graduate educations, managers, executives, administrators and finance experts.

This idle talent pool needs to be put to work to bolster the talent base of charities whose backs are sagging under the weight of a ‘perfect storm’ (i.e. more demand for services, fewer options to help clients and less money to pay for staff and resources). I am not talking about one day events where a group paints a school house. While those events are noble and helpful, they don’t provide the kind of real help non-profits need. They need volunteers who bring their business and craftsmanship skills and talents to the table. Charities need volunteers who will regularly commit to one, two or even five days a week in the office, classroom or clinic. There is a desperate need for the skills they can bring to bear — marketing, accounting, organizing and human resources management, to name a few.

Which led me to add a comment to his article:  Volunteering will allow you to gain the skills and competencies you may need to switch industries. So it essentially serves two purposes: it supports the greater good and helps the unemployed gain needed skills.

My point: While there ARE companies that are hiring, they may not be in the industry in which you specialize. Consider volunteering to gain the skills, knowledge, or competencies you may need to make the transition to, say, healthcare (which is where the most jobs are these days).  Then add this experience to your resume. It’s a win-win for everyone.

Your thoughts?

02/26/2009 Posted by | General | , , | Leave a comment

The top 10 companies that posted a wide range of job openings this week.

Job hunting? Start with the top 10 companies that posted a wide range of job openings this week.

AT&T   Fortune magazine recently named AT&T to the No. 1 spot on both the World’s Most Admired and America’s Most Admired Telecommunications Company list.

KinderCare Learning Centers The leading private provider of early childhood education and care in the United States.

Kaiser Permanente  America’s leading nonprofit integrated health plan, serving approximately 8.2 million people in nine states and the District of Columbia.

Ernst & Young America’s leading nonprofit integrated health plan, serving approximately 8.2 million people in nine states and the District of Columbia.

UnitedHealth Group UnitedHealth Group is an innovative leader in the health and well-being industry, serving approximately 65 million Americans.

MetLife    Aegis Therapies    Chase     Lexis Nexis    Cisco

02/22/2009 Posted by | General, jobs | , , , | 1 Comment

How to talk to a friend who’s been laid off

I thought this was a great post. (Hat-tip to Penelope Trunk’s Brazen Careerist). As someone fortunate to be employed (or, rather, under-employed), I wasn’t aware of how my seeming good intentions may be viewed by my less-fortunate friends and family.

Being laid off used to be taboo. But not anymore. And most of us have thought through some sort of plan for if it happens to us. Gone are the days when people pretend this is not happening.

One of the things my ex-husband and I did well, as did our peers, was learn to tag-team in the layoff department. We both got laid off pretty much all the time throughout the 90s. And somehow, we got a sort of routine, and it became a normal way of life.

Today there is a generation of us in the workforce, totally familiar with layoffs, and totally unfamiliar with the idea that a job is secure. Ever. The good news about this is that there is not a huge difference between someone laid off and someone not laid off in that all of us feel vulnerable and scared.

Which means the etiquette is different than it used to be for talking to someone who’s been laid off.

1. Don’t ask “how’s the job hunt?”
Do you know how many times a day someone hears this if he is unemployed? Ten. And even if it’s not ten really, it’s ten in his head. He asks himself that, and he imagines other people asking that, and he stresses about the answer. Because the job hunt doesn’t change much from day to day, but it’s demoralizing to report that.

So trust that someone who is laid off who has something great to report will volunteer it without you asking.

2. Ask about extracurriculars.
At this point, we have a generation that is accustomed to changing jobs often and thinking in terms of the in-between time with jobs. In between jobs is the best time for real vacations and often the best time for gaining deep knowledge of something totally new. This trend is becoming more pronounced during the current downturn. People are focusing on hobbies, kids, and their health – all interesting topics to talk about.

Those of you who are employed might find a little inspiration here. We all know that it doesn’t make sense to only do this stuff during the in-between time. So find out what changes your unemployed friends made to refocus themselves, and see if you can do it now. Before you get laid off.

3. Ask about health insurance.
There needs to be more collective knowledge on how to deal with health insurance during stints of unemployment. For most people, COBRA is about as cost-effective as a penthouse in New York City. So ask about how people are solving the insurance problem because the more we share information, the smarter we are at solving the problem when it hits us.

(What I learned from my last conversation: Move to Massachusetts. Everyone is covered there. )

4. Talk about industry news.
One of the hardest things about being laid off is keeping up in one’s industry. If you’re at the office each day, you keep up, sort of, through osmosis. But if you are not working in your field, you have to try a lot harder to keep up. Just hearing it first hand from someone who’s still employed is helpful.

So tell the person what you’re working on. Trends you’re hearing about. Personnel shifts you’ve seen. Also, gossip counts as news. Workplace gossip is a positive way to bond. The laid-off worker is cut out of this positive gossip loop, unless you supply some. So forget what your mom told you about gossip being bad karma. In this case, gossip equals good karma.

5. Offer up one good contact. (Note: that’s what The Job Exchange is doing!)
You do not need to pretend that connecting in LinkedIn is going to help this person. I mean, they should have been building their network long before the layoff loomed. But you could offer up one person you know well who could talk with the person laid off.

The truth is that we all know someone who is out of work. And we all know that the next person could be us. Anyone who is feeling smug about having a job has no grip on reality. Sure, some of it is your own doing, your own talent. But some of it is luck. Anyone could be laid off at any time.

This is why almost anyone you ask will help a friend who is laid off. Once. Giving five minutes of help is a reasonable request. So you can make it for a friend. If the friend is not smart enough to turn that five minutes into something bigger, that is not your problem.

6. Acknowledge trouble with the significant other.
More men are getting laid off than women, which puts women in a bad spot because most women choose a husband thinking he’ll earn more than she will (yes, even smarty-pants Stanford women). It used to be that we could not openly discuss the testosterone hit that comes with being laid off. But today it’s fair game, and even compassionate to acknowledge.

Not that women are picking up all the slack. They’re not. Some are in support groups to cope with their boyfriends losing their seven-figure bonuses. Other women lost their jobs right along side their partner.

But the important thing here is that men and women are talking about the relationship dynamic that goes along with a layoff, so you should tread down this conversational path as well.

7. Don’t be shy about gratitude
Tell a co-worker who’s been laid off that you miss him or her. And what you miss. It’s hard to keep up morale when you’re looking for a job. And so often we forget what we are talented at because rejection makes us feel totally un-talented.

The act of telling someone what you miss about them reminds them that they are valuable in the workplace. And it also gives you a little boost, because practicing gratitude increases your happiness by 25%. In fact, being grateful for what you have makes you happier than any job could, which is something you can remember when you’re the one who is laid off.

02/19/2009 Posted by | General, layoffs | , , , , , | 1 Comment